Dr. Joel Klenck
Dr. Joel Klenck

President

Dr. Joel Klenck graduated with his B.A. in Anthropology/Archaeology from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL and an A.M. and Ph.D. from Harvard University in the same discipline. He also studied Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Sheffield.

Dr. Klenck specialized in archaeological surveys, excavations, and zooarchaeology–the excavation and analysis of animal bones from archaeological contexts. After completing his initial field school at Northwestern University, Dr. Klenck was involved in cultural resource management (CRM) work, primarily archaeological surveys, excavations, and laboratory studies for organizations in the southeastern and eastern United States. These sites and cultures ranged from Desert Archaic and Dalton contexts to Colonial buildings. Dr. Klenck then studied archaeology and prehistory at the University of Sheffield in England and was involved in a wide array of excavations from Derbyshire to Winchester, excavating contexts varying from prehistoric periods to medieval structures. At Harvard University, Dr. Klenck continued working in the Levant engaging in numerous excavations, faunal analyses, and physical anthropology mitigation projects and laboratory studies. His Levantine archaeological experience ranged from Chalcolithic burial grounds to Bedouin ethnoarchaeology. Dr. Klenck’s current work features an expansive temporal and geographic range and includes, but is not limited to, the survey, mitigation, and analyses of Late Epipaleolithic wood structures in eastern Turkey and prehistoric sites in Polynesia including a possible ceramic manufacturing locale. Dr. Klenck thrives in adverse conditions: high-altitude zones, swamps, tropical jungles, wood lots, and deserts. In these environs, he has completed numerous studies for private clients, CRM companies, museums, universities, and government institutions.

Dr. Klenck has published or is conducting research on a wide range of subjects including the global distribution of paleontological and paleobotanical remains; archaeology of cult; experimental archaeology; ethnoarchaeology; multi-use sites; burial practices; effects of climate, conquest, and trade on archaeological contexts and stratigraphy; the Epipaleolithic/Neolithic transition; animal and plant extinctions during the Pleistocene; improvements in survey and excavation techniques; and other topics.